america-wakiewakie

"[On] May 2, 1967, 30 fully armed members of the Black Panther Party for Self-Defense and their supporters were in the California State Capitol at Sacramento, California, protesting the infamous Mulford Act. The bill on its face was aimed at banning a U.S. citizen’s right to carry loaded weapons in public, so long as the weapons were “registered, not concealed, and not pointed in a threatening manner.”
In actuality the Mulford Act – or “the Panther Bill,” as it was tagged by the media – was designed to end the BPP Police Patrols that were organized against police brutality in the Afrikan community; as it was the Panther Party’s belief that “armed citizen patrols and the arming of the citizenry as guaranteed by the Constitution were the most effective deterrents to excessive use of police force.”
The alarmed and instantaneous reaction to the fully armed BPP in Sacramento further confirmed this, and then Gov. Ronald Reagan’s signing of the bill into law catapulted the Black Panther Party for Self-Defense into national prominence.
Three months prior to this, in March 1967, the U.S. Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) had begun an “internal security” investigation of Huey Newton, prompting then FBI Director J. Edgar Hoover to announce, on Sept. 8, 1968, that the BPP was considered to be “the greatest threat to the internal security of the country.” At the time, the Black Panther Party was barely known outside of Oakland, Calif.
Despite these dire pronouncements, BPP Deputy Minister of Defense for Southern California Alprentice “Bunchy” Carter organized the Southern California branch of the BPP, with a branch office at Central Avenue and 43rd in January 1968, and January 1969 saw the BPP Free Breakfast for Children Program (FBCP) firmly under way at St. Augustine’s Church in Oakland. At that point, membership of the BPP was peaking at 10,000 members within the continental U.S. alone, and circulation of the Black Panther Newspaper had hit 139,000 by 1970.
Between 1967 and 1969, the Black Panther Party for Self Defense not only grew in local, national and international stature, they forged unity with other oppressed people and inspired the formation of the 12- and 13-point political platforms of the Brown Beret, I Wor Kuen and Young Lords political organizations.
By 1980, the Black Panther Party for Self Defense was no more, due to the depredations of FBI Director J. Edgar Hoover’s extensive program – COINTELPRO – of surveillance, infiltration, perjury, disruption, misdirection, police harassment and assassinations of party members within U.S. borders that were designed to make the political criminal.”
—Bay View National Black Newspaper

"[On] May 2, 1967, 30 fully armed members of the Black Panther Party for Self-Defense and their supporters were in the California State Capitol at Sacramento, California, protesting the infamous Mulford Act. The bill on its face was aimed at banning a U.S. citizen’s right to carry loaded weapons in public, so long as the weapons were “registered, not concealed, and not pointed in a threatening manner.”

In actuality the Mulford Act – or “the Panther Bill,” as it was tagged by the media – was designed to end the BPP Police Patrols that were organized against police brutality in the Afrikan community; as it was the Panther Party’s belief that “armed citizen patrols and the arming of the citizenry as guaranteed by the Constitution were the most effective deterrents to excessive use of police force.”

The alarmed and instantaneous reaction to the fully armed BPP in Sacramento further confirmed this, and then Gov. Ronald Reagan’s signing of the bill into law catapulted the Black Panther Party for Self-Defense into national prominence.

Three months prior to this, in March 1967, the U.S. Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) had begun an “internal security” investigation of Huey Newton, prompting then FBI Director J. Edgar Hoover to announce, on Sept. 8, 1968, that the BPP was considered to be “the greatest threat to the internal security of the country.” At the time, the Black Panther Party was barely known outside of Oakland, Calif.

Despite these dire pronouncements, BPP Deputy Minister of Defense for Southern California Alprentice “Bunchy” Carter organized the Southern California branch of the BPP, with a branch office at Central Avenue and 43rd in January 1968, and January 1969 saw the BPP Free Breakfast for Children Program (FBCP) firmly under way at St. Augustine’s Church in Oakland. At that point, membership of the BPP was peaking at 10,000 members within the continental U.S. alone, and circulation of the Black Panther Newspaper had hit 139,000 by 1970.

Between 1967 and 1969, the Black Panther Party for Self Defense not only grew in local, national and international stature, they forged unity with other oppressed people and inspired the formation of the 12- and 13-point political platforms of the Brown Beret, I Wor Kuen and Young Lords political organizations.

By 1980, the Black Panther Party for Self Defense was no more, due to the depredations of FBI Director J. Edgar Hoover’s extensive program – COINTELPRO – of surveillance, infiltration, perjury, disruption, misdirection, police harassment and assassinations of party members within U.S. borders that were designed to make the political criminal.”

Bay View National Black Newspaper

america-wakiewakie

The experience of the American Indian Movement, especially in the mid-1970s, provides what amounts to a textbook exposition of the nature of the society we now inhabit, the lengths to which its government will go to maintain the kinds of domination AIM fought to cast off, and the techniques it uses in doing so. These lessons teach what to expect, and, if properly understood, how to overcome many of the methodologies of repression. The lessons are applicable not simply to American Indians but to anyone whose lot in life is to be oppressed within the American conception of business as usual.

Ultimately, the gift bestowed by AIM is, in part, an apprehension of the fact that the Third World is not something “out there.” It is everywhere, including behind the façade of liberal democracy that masks the substance of the United States. It exists on every reservation in the nation, in the teeming ghettos of Brownsville, Detroit, and Compton, in the barrios and migrant fields and sharecropping farms of the Deep South. It persists in the desolation of the Appalachian coal regions. It is there in the burgeoning prison industry of America, warehousing by far the largest incarcerated population on the planet.

The Third World exists in the nation’s ever-proliferating, militarized police apparatus. And it is there in the piles of corpses of those—not just AIM members, but Black Panthers, Brown Berets, Puerto Rican independentistas, labor organizers, civil rights workers, and many others—who tried to say “no” and make it stick. It is there in the fate of Malcolm X and Fred Hampton, Mark Clark and Ché Payne, Geronimo ji Jaga Pratt and Alejandina Torres, Susan Rosenberg and Martin Luther King Jr., George Jackson and Ray Luc Lavasseur, Tim Blunk and Reyes Tijerina, Mutulu Shaku and Marilyn Buck, and many others.

To win, it is said, one must know one’s enemy. Winning the sorts of struggles these people engaged in is unequivocally necessary if we are to effect a constructive change in the conditions they faced and we continue to face. In this, there are still many lessons to be drawn from the crucible of AIM experience. These must be learned by all of us. They must be learned well. And soon.

america-wakiewakie
fuckyeahmarxismleninism:

The largest slave revolt in U.S. history occurred this day 203 years ago
By Littice Bacon-Blood
January 8, 2014 - The largest slave revolt in United States history occurred on this date 203 years ago. The uprising started in what is now LaPlace in St. John the Baptist Parish in 1811 and rolled eastward, with a goal of reaching New Orleans and possibly banding with other rebels to take the city.
The makeshift army of more than 200 enslaved men came from various parts of the U.S., Africa and Haiti. They were able to organize despite living miles apart on plantations along the German Coast of Louisiana.
They carried mainly farming tools as weapons, however, and were outgunned by a military detachment and local militia organized by farmers. They were stopped near Kenner.
Most of the slaves were killed during the battle. Others were later executed after a trial held at Destrehan Plantation inSt. Charles Parish.
An exhibit commemorating the revolt is on permanent display as part of the plantation’s 1811 Slave Revolt Museum and Historical Research and Education Center. And New Orleans historian Leon Waters has created a tour that retraces the steps of the uprising.
Despite the slaves’ failure to reach New Orleans, historians say the uprising succeeded in raising awareness of the cruelty of human bondage and  helped fuel the abolition movement.

fuckyeahmarxismleninism:

The largest slave revolt in U.S. history occurred this day 203 years ago

By Littice Bacon-Blood

January 8, 2014 - The largest slave revolt in United States history occurred on this date 203 years ago. The uprising started in what is now LaPlace in St. John the Baptist Parish in 1811 and rolled eastward, with a goal of reaching New Orleans and possibly banding with other rebels to take the city.

The makeshift army of more than 200 enslaved men came from various parts of the U.S., Africa and Haiti. They were able to organize despite living miles apart on plantations along the German Coast of Louisiana.

They carried mainly farming tools as weapons, however, and were outgunned by a military detachment and local militia organized by farmers. They were stopped near Kenner.

Most of the slaves were killed during the battle. Others were later executed after a trial held at Destrehan Plantation inSt. Charles Parish.

An exhibit commemorating the revolt is on permanent display as part of the plantation’s 1811 Slave Revolt Museum and Historical Research and Education Center. And New Orleans historian Leon Waters has created a tour that retraces the steps of the uprising.

Despite the slaves’ failure to reach New Orleans, historians say the uprising succeeded in raising awareness of the cruelty of human bondage and  helped fuel the abolition movement.

america-wakiewakie
thepeoplesrecord:

Franklin McCain, one of the “Greensboro Four” who in 1960 sat down at a whites-only lunch counter in North Carolina and launched a sit-in movement that would soon spread to cities across the nation, has died.
McCain died Thursday “after a brief illness at Moses Cone Hospital in Greensboro.”
McCain once told NPR, as WUNC says, about how he overcame any fear about being arrested — or having something worse happen:


"I certainly wasn’t afraid. And I wasn’t afraid because I was too angry to be afraid. If I were lucky I would be carted off to jail for a long, long time. And if I were not so lucky, then I would be going back to my campus, in a pine box."


In it remembrance of McCain, the station adds this account of the historic day in 1960:


"McCain and his classmates walked into the store, purchased some items and then walked over to the segregated counter. McCain recalls:
" ‘Fifteen seconds after I sat on that stool, I had the most wonderful feeling. I had a feeling of liberation, restored manhood; I had a natural high. And I truly felt almost invincible.’
"He hadn’t even asked for service. When McCain and the others did, they were denied. A manager told them they weren’t welcome, a police officer patted his hand with his night stick. The tension grew but it never turned violent.
"As McCain and the others continued to sit at the counter, an older white woman who had been observing the scene walked up behind him:
" ‘And she whispered in a calm voice,boys, I’m so proud of you.’
"McCain says he was stunned:
" ‘What I learned from that little incident was don’t you ever, ever stereotype anybody in this life until you at least experience them and have the opportunity to talk to them."
"Woolworth’s closed early and the four men returned to campus with empty stomachs and no idea about what they had just started. The next day another 20 students joined them and 300 came out by the end of the week. Word of the sit-ins spread by newspapers and demonstrations began in Winston-Salem, Durham, Asheville and Wilmington; within 2 months of the initial sit-in, 54 cities in nine different states had movements of their own.
"The Greensboro lunch counter desegregated six months later."



Source

thepeoplesrecord:

Franklin McCain, one of the “Greensboro Four” who in 1960 sat down at a whites-only lunch counter in North Carolina and launched a sit-in movement that would soon spread to cities across the nation, has died.

McCain died Thursday “after a brief illness at Moses Cone Hospital in Greensboro.”

McCain once told NPR, as WUNC says, about how he overcame any fear about being arrested — or having something worse happen:

"I certainly wasn’t afraid. And I wasn’t afraid because I was too angry to be afraid. If I were lucky I would be carted off to jail for a long, long time. And if I were not so lucky, then I would be going back to my campus, in a pine box."

In it remembrance of McCain, the station adds this account of the historic day in 1960:

"McCain and his classmates walked into the store, purchased some items and then walked over to the segregated counter. McCain recalls:

" ‘Fifteen seconds after I sat on that stool, I had the most wonderful feeling. I had a feeling of liberation, restored manhood; I had a natural high. And I truly felt almost invincible.’

"He hadn’t even asked for service. When McCain and the others did, they were denied. A manager told them they weren’t welcome, a police officer patted his hand with his night stick. The tension grew but it never turned violent.

"As McCain and the others continued to sit at the counter, an older white woman who had been observing the scene walked up behind him:

" ‘And she whispered in a calm voice,boys, I’m so proud of you.’

"McCain says he was stunned:

" ‘What I learned from that little incident was don’t you ever, ever stereotype anybody in this life until you at least experience them and have the opportunity to talk to them."

"Woolworth’s closed early and the four men returned to campus with empty stomachs and no idea about what they had just started. The next day another 20 students joined them and 300 came out by the end of the week. Word of the sit-ins spread by newspapers and demonstrations began in Winston-Salem, Durham, Asheville and Wilmington; within 2 months of the initial sit-in, 54 cities in nine different states had movements of their own.

"The Greensboro lunch counter desegregated six months later."

america-wakiewakie
otipemsiw:

assangistan:

MUST SEE
via hick-ups:

A photograph from the 1870’s showing tens of thousands of bison skulls. They were mass slaughtered by the U.S. Army to make room for cattle and force Native American tribes into starvation.


[bolding mine]
Mass slaughter of buffalo and bison took place in Canadian territory as well, and was part of a deliberate campaign to break Indigenous resistance to (further) settler incursions onto Native land and the railroad.  The removal of the buffalo also meant that when it came time to sign treaties, the Canadian government could more or less set any terms it saw fit and Indigenous leaders basically had to comply with them or their people would freeze and starve (that’s if gov officials even bothered to translate the actual terms of the treaty at all).
The “disappearance” of the buffalo is narrativized as part of a larger myth surrounding the “disappearing Indian” whose absence clears the land for the incoming white pioneers to take their place.  The murder, destruction, slaughter of bison and buffalo was a tactic essential to the genocidal colonial project. 

otipemsiw:

assangistan:

MUST SEE

via hick-ups:

A photograph from the 1870’s showing tens of thousands of bison skulls. They were mass slaughtered by the U.S. Army to make room for cattle and force Native American tribes into starvation.

[bolding mine]

Mass slaughter of buffalo and bison took place in Canadian territory as well, and was part of a deliberate campaign to break Indigenous resistance to (further) settler incursions onto Native land and the railroad.  The removal of the buffalo also meant that when it came time to sign treaties, the Canadian government could more or less set any terms it saw fit and Indigenous leaders basically had to comply with them or their people would freeze and starve (that’s if gov officials even bothered to translate the actual terms of the treaty at all).

The “disappearance” of the buffalo is narrativized as part of a larger myth surrounding the “disappearing Indian” whose absence clears the land for the incoming white pioneers to take their place.  The murder, destruction, slaughter of bison and buffalo was a tactic essential to the genocidal colonial project. 

america-wakiewakie
[America’s] myth purports to give substance to basic nationally professed ideals: democracy, freedom from oppression, and material success deriving from morality and hard work. American history, as it is purveyed supports the myth. And American history as it is ingested by the masses of Americans, is, by and large, pure Bullfinch. Bullfinch it must be. For if our government and our church (those noblest of institutions, one human and the other divine) be complicit, to put it gently, in rapine, slavery, and genocide, what shall sustain us? Not the thought that such unpleasantries were but labor pains, the inevitable trauma of man emerging from a state of viciousness and evil to one of nobility and justice For the myth that has hidden from us what we have been, and have done, still hides from us what we still are, and what we still do. It’s not that we must suppress historical truth to preserve the myth the way some societies we call closed do. We need not burn books, even though we sometimes do. The crucial realities, both historical and current, are quite available. We just ignore them. Probably we can’t stand to confront them. To do so would not make us psychotic: it would simply reveal our psychosis. For even an incipient comprehension of the vast gulf between our myth and the reality would make our schizophrenia acute.
america-wakiewakie

The French had come up the St. Lawrence looking for profit. The profit was in beaver pelts for which there was an enormous demand in Europe. The French secured the Hurons (themselves an Iroquoian people) as allies in order, through them, to control the fur trade. They seduced the Hurons with the usual European products - guns, powder, shot, hatchets, traps, kettles -which gave the Indians who possessed them complete physical supremacy over those neighboring tribes who did not. The Iroquois maintained a semblance of parity with the Hurons for a time by trading beaver to the Dutch for these same products of European civilization. But soon the Iroquois beaver supply was depleted; the French and Hurons controlled the trade routes and the trade. The Iroquois must share in this trade or die (a civilized arrangement imposed on the Indians with the arrival of the Europeans). Efforts between the Hurons and the Iroquois to share the trade were frequently frustrated by the French Jesuits who, along with the civil authorities, wanted no peace that would divert furs to the Iroquois and thus wealth to the heretical Dutch. By inflaming animosities, priests helped prevent amicable settlement for 25 years (1620-1645). Under the profit motive triumphant, French missions were indistinguishable from French trade. Such an arrangement, as the Jesuit Father Rageuneau pointed out at the time, was “necessary for maintenance of the faith in all these regions, for the good of the French colonies, and the support of New France.” Whatever other intentions the Jesuits had, the Iroquois considered them to be the “chief clerks of the fur trade.” Finally, however, under terms favorable to the French, a peace treaty was signed in 1645 between the Hurons and Iroquois which guaranteed Iroquois participation in the fur trade. Nonetheless, with French and Jesuit encouragement, the Hurons immediately broke the treaty in 1646, by delivering all pelts to the French, thereby depriving the Iroquois of their only means of survival.

The Iroquois, consequently, did the one thing they could do - attack the French-Huron trade routes. Joques was caught by an Iroquois war party in 1646, as he entered Mohawk territory in another attempt to convert them. Jean de Brébeuf was captured in the Iroquois attack on the French-Huron trading post near St. Ignace, Ontario, in 1649. Both were put to death. Repeated Iroquois attacks cut off the Hurons from their sources of trade, and since they were exclusively traders, they had no stores of food. In the winter of 1649-50, the Huron Nation ceased to exist. It starved to death. Of 35,000 members of a noble people, some 300 survivors straggled into Quebec after the spring thaw. Genocide. French variety. Orchestrated by church and state.

america-wakiewakie

And what of Tekakwitha? What of the Venerable Kateri Tekakwitha, the glory of the Mohawks? Did she not leave her own people, the savage Mohawks, with their paganism and violence and lechery, and go to live with Marquette’s fellow white Christian Jesuits? And did she not fast and pray and remain chaste? And did not her skin, as Father Holland rhapsodizes in the Song of Tekakwitha, immediately after her death turn from swarthy to white? Lily white. Whiteness, the ultimate criterion of her sanctity. Shall we not honor her? No, Tekakwitha needs no honor from us. She was what she was, and in honoring her these white Europeans are but canonizing themselves. And so, today, Indian children in mission schools are taught to emulate Kateri Tekakwitha, the white Mohawk - a dishonor to her, an insult to her people, and a testimony to our determination that our national myth will be perpetuated by any and all means possible. The Indian people do not need you, Tekakwitha. The whites do. You are a necessary part of our myth. And a pope, Pius XII, seals your alienation from your people when in the decree proclaiming your venerability, he affirms that you come from a people “most corrupt and steeped in heathen error”. (Perhaps some theologian will rise up to render papal authority compatible with papal bigotry within the narrow confines of a single sentence.) But the myth is not disturbed by such irregularities.

So while the Indians are ghosts, the myth lives on. It reinforces our conviction of absolute righteousness in our history and our destiny. And so the horror has no end. Cotton Mather is Lt. Calley. French Catholicism and English Puritanism were alike bastard offsprings of Christianity and greed, as are any current counterparts. Ordinances of the original 13 “council fires”, as the Indian called them, appropriating funds for Indian scalps, are not qualitatively different from later-day Pentagon demands for Vietnamese body counts. The spirit that enabled American fighting men to wear Indian women’s genitals as hat bands and play ball with their severed breasts is the same spirit which in a later day would enable American fighting men to rape Vietnamese women before wasting them. The reality is ineffable and unsufferable tragedy. So we must have myth.